The Canadian Scandinavian Foundation will resume awarding scholarships in 2018.

What is the Canadian-Scandinavian Foundation?

The Canadian-Scandinavian Foundation was established on 20 June 1950 as a national, non-profit organization with the express purpose of providing assistance and support to qualified and talented young Canadians of university age planning a study semester or a research visit to one or more of the Nordic countries, be it Iceland in the North Atlantic, Denmark in the South, Finland in the East, Norway on the Atlantic, or Sweden on the Baltic.

Who benefits from the Foundation’s efforts?

The founders believed that Canadians, as well as Canada as a whole, would be in a position to benefit greatly from the Nordic experience in many fields such as public policy and planning, technology and engineering, resource management, the arts, as well as the scientific world at large where the Nordic countries over the decades have demonstrated excellence and outstanding skills. In the past sixty years, the CSF has enabled more than 300 Canadian students to study in one of these countries. Many scholarship winners have built upon these Scandinavian contacts in their later professional careers.

How is the Foundation funded?

Apart from the CSF-administered scholarships funded by the Swedish Institute, the Foundation depends on individual and corporate donations. Regular corporate donors include: ASEA inc., Fagersta Ltd., Nova Scotia Forest Industries, Atlas Copco Ltd., Pharmacia Canada, IKEA (Canada), Flygt Canada Ltd., Volvo Canada Ltd., The Royal Bank of Canada and many other Canadian and Scandinavian firms operating in Canada. Donations are fully deductible for Income Tax purposes.

What is the Canadian-Scandinavian Foundation?

The Canadian-Scandinavian Foundation was established on 20 June 1950 as a national, non-profit organization with the express purpose of providing assistance and support to qualified and talented young Canadians of university age planning a study semester or a research visit to one or more of the Nordic countries, be it Iceland in the North Atlantic, Denmark in the South, Finland in the East, Norway on the Atlantic, or Sweden on the Baltic.

Who benefits from the Foundation’s efforts?

The founders believed that Canadians, as well as Canada as a whole, would be in a position to benefit greatly from the Nordic experience in many fields such as public policy and planning, technology and engineering, resource management, the arts, as well as the scientific world at large where the Nordic countries over the decades have demonstrated excellence and outstanding skills. In the past sixty years, the CSF has enabled more than 300 Canadian students to study in one of these countries. Many scholarship winners have built upon these Scandinavian contacts in their later professional careers.

Sarah Rintoul’s experience in the Fall Exchange Program 2016

I studied Friluftsliv at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NSSS) in the Fall 2016 semester. Friluftsliv directly translates into “open air life”, but is often called outdoor life. It is a Norwegian philosophy and lifestyle that focuses on exploring and appreciating nature. The study program varied in format, from experiential learning outside in nature, to theoretical lessons in lecture halls, and research and discussion projects with classmates.

Our first experiential learning trip took us to the mountains of Jotunheimen National Park. For 7 days, myself and 40 students (15 international, 25 Norwegian) orienteered our way through valleys and over mountains. Topics such as mountain formation, high altitude vegetation, compass skills and maybe most importantly, group dynamics, were the focus of this trip. With long daily hiking distances and heavy backpacks, I can say that this trip was the most physically exhausting thing that I have ever done. However, I can also say that it was the most inspirational and enjoyable outdoor trip I have ever done.

For the second trip, we stayed closer to home and ventured into Nordmarka, the forest area north of Oslo and NSSS. Instead of tents and camping stoves that we had used previously, we took with us tarps, ropes, axes and saws. Learning topics focused on finding dry wood, fire starting and shelter building. We were given more freedom on this trip and planned individual routes and camping places with smaller groups. I admire the balance between the task-oriented and relationship-oriented aspects of our time in the forest. During the hours of daylight, the tasks dominated as we hiked, chopped down trees, prepared camp, and cooked meals. As soon as dinner was ready though, we enjoyed many hours around the fire we labored to make, and I treasure the conversations we had.

Our third large trip was to the Beitostølen Health Sports Center, a place where many people with physical and mental disabilities come for adapted physical activity and rehabilitation. Our class prepared a “winter friluftsliv festival”. It evolved into a fun winter play day for a group of kids at the center. In addition, we had lessons on avalanche safety, snow shelters, and the Norwegian traditions of cross-country skiing. As well, our experiences garnered in how to stay warm were used as we camped in the snow.

Throughout my exchange, I began to discover what friluftsliv really means. I’ve concluded that friluftsliv is a subjective experience in nature, and cannot be contained by objective classifications. I admire this Norwegian way of life and will keep it alive as I settle back in Canada. Thank you for supporting my adventure!

Sarah Rintoul

We are pleased to inform the recipients of the 2016 Canadian-Scandinavian scholarship:

Aden Farhia, Ana Angelovska, Bryce Wittrock, Jean-Daniel Beauchesne, Julie Malefant-Lepage, Leona Dennis, Lorne Pardy, Maria Pettyjohn, Mariebelle Leclerc-Halle, Sarah Rintoul, Sondra Mpyls and Starr Campagnarp

Recent Scholarship Winners:

… I have been able to appreciate this summer how beneficial and important exchanges with Scandinavian countries can be for us. The CSF grant permitted me to have useful contact with researchers in my field of ecology in Finland last summer…

Yves De Koninck
Laval University,
Québec

…My research project to study the Swedish apprenticeship programme in the forestry industry was made possible to a large extent by the CSF grant.

Russ Waylott
Port Hawkesbury, N.S.

…As a recipient of a CSF Grant I was able to conduct a series of interviews with Swedish government officials, business people and academics which set the stage for my comparative analysis of Swedish and Canadian trade policies.

Michael Hawes
Toronto, Ontario